Birthstone of the Month: Sapphire

Sapphire_ring

Depending on their trace element content, sapphire, a variety of the mineral corundum, might be blue, yellow, green, orange, pink, purple or even show a six-rayed star if cut as a cabochon.

The name “sapphire” can also apply to any corundum that’s not ruby, another corundum variety.

Traditionally, sapphire symbolizes nobility, truth, sincerity, and faithfulness. It has decorated the robes of royalty and clergy members for centuries. Its extraordinary color is the standard against which other blue gems—from topaz to tanzanite—are measured. (source: GIA.edu)

August Birthstone: Peridot

Found in lava, meteorites, and deep in the earth’s mantle, yellow-green PERIDOT is the extreme gem.

The ancient Egyptians mined peridot on the Red Sea island of Zabargad, the source for many large fine peridots in the world’s museums. The Egyptians called it the “gem of the sun.” Today this gem is still prized for its restful yellowish green hues and long history.

Most peridot formed deep inside the earth and was delivered to the surface by volcanoes. Some also came to earth in meteorites, but this extraterrestrial peridot is extremely rare, and not likely to be seen in a retail jewelry store.

peridot

Birthstone of the Month: Ruby

Ruby has accumulated a host of legends over the centuries. People in India believed that rubies enabled their owners to live in peace with their enemies. In Burma (a ruby source since at least 600 AD—now called Myanmar), warriors possessed rubies to make them invincible in battle. However, it wasn’t enough to just wear the rubies. They had to insert them into their flesh and make them part of their bodies.

rubies

The name ruby comes from the Latin word ruber, which means “red.” The glowing red of ruby suggested an inextinguishable flame burning in the stone, even shining through clothing and able to boil water.

 (source: GIA.edu)